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Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

3 edition of National identity, ethnic identity, and party identity in Taiwan found in the catalog.

National identity, ethnic identity, and party identity in Taiwan

Chang-Yen Tsai

National identity, ethnic identity, and party identity in Taiwan

by Chang-Yen Tsai

  • 70 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by University of Maryland School of Law in Baltimore, MD .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Group identity -- Taiwan.,
  • Nationalism -- Taiwan.,
  • Ethnicity -- Taiwan.,
  • Taiwan -- Politics and government -- 1945-

  • Edition Notes

    StatementChang-Yen Tsai.
    SeriesMaryland series in contemporary Asian studies -- 2007, no. 1.
    ContributionsUniversity of Maryland at Baltimore. School of Law.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHN747.5 .T73 2007
    The Physical Object
    Pagination34 p. :
    Number of Pages34
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16664856M
    ISBN 101932330186
    LC Control Number2008554967
    OCLC/WorldCa188741267

    Disaggregating the concept of national identity, Rigger raised four distinct issues that are related to the discussion, including 1) provincial origin, 2) nationality, 3) citizenship and 4) policy preference. As Rigger elaborated, provincial origin (ethnic identity) is the most politically significant demographic division in Taiwan’s society. Taiwan's national identity remains an open question. Ethnic Relations. In spite of their cultural and linguistic differences, aborigines have found a common cause in their struggle for land rights and self-determination. Before , Taiwan had a one-party system with the KMT firmly in control. Although "outside the party" candidates.

    Furthermore, the distribution of national identity among ethnic groups displays much greater variation than only a Taiwanese/Chinese identity does. More specifically, mainlanders show the highest degree of homogeneity in national identity, .   As we look to enter the second decade of the 21 st century, Taiwan’s quest for identity remains the most contentious issue in the domestic arena of Taiwanese politics. From here, it spills over into the cross-Strait relationship and impacts on regional and global security.

    national belonging that "constructs the nation as an ethnically homogeneous object" (Gilroy 3), national identity is rewritten and purged of its seamy side. Within this narrative, national identity is structured through a notion of citi zenship and patriotism that subordinates ethnic. The book explores such questions as: Is Lee Teng-hui an opportunistic recidivist who is interested only in his own self-preservation, or is he a hero who not only propelled Taiwan into a new era, but also constructed a new national identity for the islanders? Are the multi-ethnic islanders culturally 'Chinese' or are they 'Taiwanese'?


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National identity, ethnic identity, and party identity in Taiwan by Chang-Yen Tsai Download PDF EPUB FB2

Culture Politics and Linguistic Recognition in Taiwan: Ethnicity, National Identity, and the Party System (Routledge Research on Taiwan Series) [Dupre, Jean-Francois] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Taiwan identity and identity transition National National identity Ethnic identity Party identity Conclusion.

Series Title: Maryland series in contemporary Asian studies,no. Responsibility: Chang-Yen Tsai. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more.

National identity, ethnic identity, and party identity in Taiwan in SearchWorks catalog. This book examines how the interplay of ethnicity, national identity and party politics has shaped current debates on national culture and linguistic recognition in Taiwan.

It suggests that the ethnolinguistic distribution of the electorate has led parties to adopt distinctive strategies in an attempt to broaden their ethnic support bases. Taiwan’s electoral and party politics are not only reflective of social cleavage, but also constructive in shaping ordinary people’s party identification and national identity.

On the one hand, party identity among the Taiwanese people has been experiencing a great change since the early s, and particularly in recent : Gang Lin. Ethnolinguistic affiliation and national identity have been important cleavages in Taiwanese society and party politics.

However, the place of language in Taiwanese identity and its influence on different aspects of political behaviour remain understudied. This paper looks at the construction of diasporic identity in Taiwan among the Mainlanders who arrived with Chiang Kai-shek at the conclusion of World War II.

In the early decades of Chinese Nationalist rule, which many Taiwanese perceived National identity colonial rule, ethnic differences between Mainlanders and Native Taiwanese were constructed through state violence, political.

Indeed, the processes that create ethnic and national identities are part and parcel of the same historical processes. It is also necessary to relate national identity to ethnicity, as national identity is imagined differently by different ethnic groups in a nation‐state.

The paper describes Malay and Chinese ethnicity as well as the complex. Analysis of the lyrics from this movement reveals evidence of an interweaving of ‘Malaysian’ national identity and ‘Chinese’ ethnic identity in these cultural productions.

The paper describes and analyzes crucial elements of cultural and national identity-building in China from the 19 th century to the present: the unfolding of the identity crisis following its repeated defeats by Western powers in the 19 th century and the attempts of China’s intellectual elite to develop a new cultural and national identity.

The paper also deals with the main. By Chang-Yen Tsai, Published on 01/01/   “In Taiwan, by contrast, the tragic events ofwhen thousands of civilians were killed beginning February 28 – long suppressed during the era of KMT one-party rule – are now freely discussed and openly acknowledged in the free society that is contemporary Taiwan.

Taiwan’s identity consolidation toward civic nationalism stands to fare better at incorporating a diverse array of newcomers than South Korea’s approach, which uses multicultural rhetoric, but. Hongkongers’ sense of belonging and national identity first started to develop after the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) came to power in mainland China inand it has continued to diverge ever since.

While Hongkongers increasingly demand democracy and political freedom, the CCP has been actively suppressing political dissent. The definition of 'Taiwanese' identity has been an ongoing issue for several decades arising from the political rivalry between Taiwan (officially Republic of China, ROC) and the People's Republic of China (PRC).

People from Taiwan are frustrated by the political rivalry which is the cause of confusion in people's national identity, both inside and outside Taiwan.

The one China policy officially supported by the People's Republic of China, the United States, and other countries asserts that there is only one China and Taiwan is a part of it.

The debate over whether the people of Taiwan are Chinese or independently Taiwanese is, Melissa J. Brown argues, a matter of identity: Han ethnic identity, Chinese national identity, and the.

Chinese national identity and Taiwanese national identity. Chiang and KMT which still had claim to China as the “Republic of China” tried to Sinocize the island with their official nationalism based on China as the geographic unit and Taiwan as.

Title: National Identity, Ethnic Identity, and Party Identity in Taiwan Author: Chang-Yen Tsai Keywords: nationalism, group identify, ethnicity, politics & government.

At issue is the persistent uncertainty about the national identity of Taiwan. This reflects the stark clash of nationalist visions: the Chinese nationalism manifested by the Mainlander elite in the ruling Nationalist Party (KMT), and the Taiwanese nationalism manifested by those who advocate that Taiwan be an independent state.

Taiwan has become a democracy despite the inability of its political elite to agree on the national identity of the state.

This is a study of the history of democratisation in the light of the national identity problem, based on interviews with leading figures in the KMT and opposition parties. Taiwan is a divided society; divided along the lines of ethnicity and national identity.

During much of the s and earlier, ethnicity played an important role for the opposition movement to mobilize popular support in fighting for democracy, but as Taiwan becomes democratic, national identity turns out to be more salient than ethnicity in shaping political competition on the island.

In Book 6, Taiwan was defined as the ‘native place’ (xiangtu). Books 8 to 10, focusing on Chinese accomplishments, culture and migration, were used to foster Chinese identity. Books 9 and 10 dealt with national history, and Taiwan did not receive any attention.no party in Taiwan has the leewayÑor the willÑto take substantial steps toward a political deal with the Beijing government.

The Concept of National Identity and the Taiwan Case At this point, a brief look at the concept of national identity may be useful to National Identity (London: Penguin Books, ), p.

3. Ibid.